Resources for Libraries

Celebrate #WorldKidLitMonth in your library!

Welcome librarians! We recognise how important you are in engaging children with reading and books. Whether you are working in schools or working in communities, you have such a wealth of knowledge to share. You may already have translated titles in your collection, or you may just be starting out with books in translation, but #WorldKidLitMonth is the perfect opportunity to explore the world through books. Please do let us know if there’s anything else we can add that would help you, or ask our #WorldKidLit community on Twitter.

The resources you have created for World Kid Lit Month are excellent,
so comprehensive and interesting that I am sure that they will be
valuable to teachers and librarians.

Anne Thompson, Chair of the Surrey Branch of the School Library Association, UK

Why celebrate #WorldKidLitMonth in your library?

1. Children deserve to feel they and their families are represented in the books they encounter at school and in the library, and that includes reflecting ethnic diversitydisability and neurodiversity, diverse family structures, and also cultural and linguistic diversity.

2. Books translated into English from other languages are a window onto the world! Only 5% of the world’s population speaks English as a main language, so if we read in translation we vastly open up the range of authors and perspectives on offer.

3. Highlighting the work of authors, illustrators, poets and graphic novel artists who work in languages other than English, and their translators, is a powerful way to value other languages and centre readers’ multilicultural experiences and family heritage.

How to celebrate #WorldKidLitMonth in your library

Create a #WorldKidLitMonth display. You may be surprised how many books in translation you already have on your shelves. Take a look at our downloadables page for book lists including 20th Century classics (think Pippy Longstocking, Asterix, the Little Prince and the Moomins) and 21st Century favourites.

Once you’ve made your display, show us your #shelfies. Share your pictures on social media with hashtag #WorldKidLitMonth and we’d love to share what you’ve created!

If you’ve got some wall space, you could create a display with a map of the world showing where the different books comes from. A great way to really visualise what we mean by global literature!

Use our resources to tailor your library to the people that use it. You can search our blog by language, country, region and age group. If bilingual books is what you’re looking for, take a look at this page.

We also publish a list each year of new releases: children’s and YA books in translation from a huge range of languages, in 2021, 2020, 2019.

World Kid Lit Book Lists …

Here you’ll find some downloadable illustrated PDF lists to help you source translated children’s and YA books. These lists can also help you identify translated titles from your existing collection.

Get in touch!

We would love to interview more librarians and teacher-librarians for the blog! Please tell us how you include international children’s books in your collection, which translated children’s and teen books have proven popular, and how your library has marked #WorldKidLitMonth.

Email us at worldkidlit@gmail.com or tag us on Twitter at @worldkidlit, or instagram at @worldkidlit

Finding children’s books from around the world

Riveting Reads: A World of Books in Translation, ed. Daniel Hahn and Joy Court (SLA)